TURP Transurethral Resection Prostate (penis) Surgery – PreOp® Patient Education

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TURP Transurethral Resection Prostate Surgery – PreOp® Patient Education – StoreMD™ for Physician videos:
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Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a Trans Urethral Resection of the Prostate – or TURP. But what exactly does that mean?

he prostate gland is a walnut-sized organ that is part of your reproductive system.

It provides some of the fluid contained in semen.

The prostate is located just under the bladder and behind the testicles.
The urethra — a hollow tube that carries both urine and semen to the penis — passes through the prostatTe.

In some men, the prostate gland becomes enlarged. Symptoms of an enlarged prostate include:
Patient Education
* a full bladder feeling even when the bladder is empty

* pain when urinating

* weak urinary stream

* infertility

* and sexual dysfunction.

To relieve you of your symptoms, your doctor feels that you would benefit from a surgical procedure called TURP.

TURP is designed to relieve symptoms by reducing the size of the prostate.
It is also a diagnostic procedure. Tissue removed during a resection of the prostate or TURP is routinely screened for the presence of cancer.

So make sure that you ask your doctor to carefully explain the reasons behind this recommendation.

Your Procedure:

On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown.

You may receive a sedative by mouth and an intravenous line may be put in.

Once on the table, your feet and legs will be placed in an elevated position with your knees apart.

The nurse will swab the penis with an antiseptic solution.

Your doctor will then lift your penis upward.

A well-lubricated instrument called a resectoscope is then gently inserted into the urethra.

When the resectoscope reaches the back of the penis, your doctor will pull the penis downward in order to create a straight path into the prostate.

Using this tool, your doctor will then scrape excess tissue from the prostate, restoring it to its normal size.

Tissue removed from the prostate may be sent a laboratory for analysis.

When the surgery is complete, your doctor will remove the resectoscope. Your doctor will probably ask you to wear a temporary Foley catheter.

A Foley catheter is a narrow tube inserted through your urethra and into your bladder. The catheter is connected to a bag that is attached to your leg by a strap. While the Foley catheter is in place, urine will pass from your bladder into the bag. You will not need to urinate into a toilet.

The nurse will show you how to change the bag when it is full. An appointment will be made for you to return to the doctor's office in a couple of days to have the catheter removed. As soon as the anesthesia wears off and you feel comfortable, you'll be allowed to leave.

Patient Education Company

TURP Transurethral Resection Prostate (penis) Surgery - PreOp® Patient Education

TURP Transurethral Resection Prostate Surgery - PreOp® Patient Education - StoreMD™ for Physician videos: http://store.preop.com
Patient Education Company
Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a Trans Urethral Resection of the Prostate - or TURP. But what exactly does that mean?

he prostate gland is a walnut-sized organ that is part of your reproductive system.

It provides some of the fluid contained in semen.

The prostate is located just under the bladder and behind the testicles.
The urethra -- a hollow tube that carries both urine and semen to the penis -- passes through the prostatTe.

In some men, the prostate gland becomes enlarged. Symptoms of an enlarged prostate include:
Patient Education
* a full bladder feeling even when the bladder is empty

* pain when urinating

* weak urinary stream

* infertility

* and sexual dysfunction.

To relieve you of your symptoms, your doctor feels that you would benefit from a surgical procedure called TURP.

TURP is designed to relieve symptoms by reducing the size of the prostate.
It is also a diagnostic procedure. Tissue removed during a resection of the prostate or TURP is routinely screened for the presence of cancer.

So make sure that you ask your doctor to carefully explain the reasons behind this recommendation.

Your Procedure:

On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown.

You may receive a sedative by mouth and an intravenous line may be put in.

Once on the table, your feet and legs will be placed in an elevated position with your knees apart.

The nurse will swab the penis with an antiseptic solution.

Your doctor will then lift your penis upward.

A well-lubricated instrument called a resectoscope is then gently inserted into the urethra.

When the resectoscope reaches the back of the penis, your doctor will pull the penis downward in order to create a straight path into the prostate.

Using this tool, your doctor will then scrape excess tissue from the prostate, restoring it to its normal size.

Tissue removed from the prostate may be sent a laboratory for analysis.

When the surgery is complete, your doctor will remove the resectoscope. Your doctor will probably ask you to wear a temporary Foley catheter.

A Foley catheter is a narrow tube inserted through your urethra and into your bladder. The catheter is connected to a bag that is attached to your leg by a strap. While the Foley catheter is in place, urine will pass from your bladder into the bag. You will not need to urinate into a toilet.

The nurse will show you how to change the bag when it is full. An appointment will be made for you to return to the doctor's office in a couple of days to have the catheter removed. As soon as the anesthesia wears off and you feel comfortable, you'll be allowed to leave.

Patient Education Company

17 thoughts on “TURP Transurethral Resection Prostate (penis) Surgery – PreOp® Patient Education

    1. +liviu holca.. thanks for letting me know. my husband had a check up in the hospital a few days ago and has been told that there,s a lump in the bladder.so he,ll have to go for the surgery but it,s not prostate cancer. But even this sounds scary and worrying to me..

    2. +liviu holca , my husband,s been told that he has __Transurethral Resection Of Bladder Tumour… hope for the best and praying that it doesn’t come back after his surgery. Been told that there’s not 100% chance of getting rid of it all. 🙁

    3. +Mumtaz Juneja . Ask for the pathology report (it may take a week), then see what is the final diagnosis then look it up on the internet and you will get very well informed of all the choices available if needed be.

  1. Over 240000 views… 4 comments. It seems like the only way to get rid of the a-holes is to talk about p-holes.

  2. I recently began using a penis health creme and I gotta say.. I sleep better at night. The creme is called Man1 Man Oil and it delivers dose of vitamins, nutrients and antioxidants directly to my penis every day. This keeps the organ extra healthy, strong and contributes to its longevity. You guys should check this creme out.

    1. I’ll be 57 in less than 3 weeks and I’m thinking about having this procedure done.  Your comments have me thinking twice about it.

    2. +Tyrd Ferguson Well discuss with your doctor and get a 2nd option before you do it. What do I know not a doctor I’m just saying what I have heard.

Comments are closed.