Acid Attack on Four U.S. Students Wasn’t Terror Act, France Says

Paris (AP) — Four American college students were attacked with acid Sunday at a train station in France, but French authorities so far do not think extremist views motivated the 41 -year-old woman who was arrested as the alleged assailant, the local prosecutor's office and the students' school said.

Boston College, a private Jesuit university in Massachusetts, said in a statement Sunday that the four female students were treated at a hospital for burns after they were sprayed in the face with acid in the city of Marseille. The statement said the four all were juniors studying abroad, three of them at the college's Paris program.

"It appears that the students are fine, considering the circumstances, though they may require additional treatment for burns," Nick Gozik, who directs Boston College's Office of International Programs. "We have been in contact with the students and their parents and remain in touch with French officials and the U.S. Embassy regarding the incident."

Police in France described the suspect as "disturbed" and said the attack was not thought at this point to be terror-related, according the university's statement.

The Paris prosecutor's office said earlier Sunday that its counter-terrorism division had decided for the time being not to assume jurisdiction for investigating the attack. The prosecutor's office in the capital, which has responsibility for all terror-related cases in France, did not explain the reasoning behind the decision.

A spokeswoman for the Marseille prosecutor's office told The Associated Press in a telephone call that the suspect did not make any extremist threats or declarations during the late morning attack at the city's Saint Charles train station. She said there were no obvious indications that the woman's actions were terror-related.

The spokeswoman spoke on condition of anonymity, per the custom of the French judicial system. She said all four of the victims were in their 20s and treated at a hospital, two of them for shock. The suspect was taken into police custody.

Boston College identified the students as Courtney Siverling, Charlotte Kaufman, Michelle Krug and Kelsey Kosten.

The Marseille fire department was alerted just after 11 a.m. and dispatched four vehicles and 14 firefighters to the train station, a department spokeswoman said.

Two of the Americans were "slightly injured" with acid but did not require emergency medical treatment from medics at the scene, the spokeswoman said. She requested anonymity in keeping with fire department protocol.

A person with knowledge of the investigation said the suspect had a history of mental health problems but no apparent past links to extremism. The person was not authorized to be publicly named speaking about the investigation. Regional newspaper La Provence said the assailant remained at the site of the attack without trying to flee.

France has seen scattered attacks by unstable individuals as well as extremist violence in recent years, including in Marseille, a port city in southern France that is closer to Barcelona than Paris.

A driver deliberately rammed into two bus stops in Marseille last month, killing a woman, but officials said it wasn't terror-related.

In April, French police said they thwarted an imminent "terror attack" and arrested two suspected radicals in Marseille just days before the first round of France's presidential election. Paris prosecutor Francois Molins told reporters the two suspects "were getting ready to carry out an imminent, violent action." In January 2016, a 15-year-old Turkish Kurd was arrested after attacking a Jewish teacher on a Marseille street. He told police he acted in the name of the Islamic State group.

___

Angela Charlton in Paris and Crystal Hill in Boston contributed to the report.

    Read more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-09-17/urgent-official-4-us-tourists-attacked-with-acid-in-marseille

    Intel CEO Becomes Third Chief to Quit Trump Council After Riots

    Intel Corp.’s Brian Krzanich joined Under Armour Inc.’s Kevin Plank in becoming the latest chief executives to quit President Donald Trump’s council of U.S. business leaders, as membership on the panel has become enmeshed in the country’s volatile politics after violent riots in Virginia over the weekend.

    The moves come hours after Merck & Co.’s Kenneth Frazier first stepped down from the business council. Plank’s departure is a particularly sharp rebuke to Trump, after the Under Armour executive earlier this year came under fire for commenting that the president was a “real asset” for the country.

    "I resigned to call attention to the serious harm our divided political climate is causing to critical issues, including the serious need to address the decline of American manufacturing," Intel’s Krzanich said in a company blog post.

    Plank said in a tweeted statement that “Under Armour engages in innovation and sport, not politics,” while Merck’s Frazier said he quit “as a matter of personal conscience, I feel a responsibility to take a stand against intolerance and extremism.” 

    Trump responded to Frazier with a couple jabs, tweeting late Monday that “@Merck Pharma is a leader in higher & higher drug prices while at the same time taking jobs out of the U.S.”

    Over the weekend, one woman was killed and many others were injured after a man in a car rammed a group of counter-demonstrators during a daylong melee in Charlottesville, Virginia. White supremacists and other hate groups had massed in the city to protest the removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee.

    Trump was widely criticized by U.S. lawmakers and other officials for not denouncing white supremacists in a statement on Saturday in which he said “many sides” were at fault for the violence. The president has repeatedly drawn fire for his relations with white nationalist groups and his handling of issues related to minorities.

    Speaking from the White House on Monday, Trump denounced white supremacists and declared racism “evil.”

    “To anyone who acted criminally in this weekend’s racist violence, you will be held accountable,” Trump said, calling for unity in the wake of the tragedy.

    The CEO departures show how corporate leaders are walking a narrow line in working with the Trump administration to help shape policy around taxes, immigration and other issues, while trying not to alienate customers in an increasingly tense political environment.

    Plank’s pro-Trump commentary earlier this year sparked an uproar from shoppers and very public dissent among Under Armour’s athletes, including his most-valued sneaker pitchman, basketball star Stephen Curry. The CEO in a television interview had declared that Trump is “pro-business” and a “real asset.”

    After a Wall Street analyst downgraded the company, Plank took out a full-page newspaper ad, saying his words praising Trump “did not accurately reflect” his intent. He said the company opposed the president’s executive order to ban refugees from certain countries.

    The president’s council has included top executives from Boeing Co., Dow Chemical Co. and Johnson & Johnson. A handful of CEOs have stepped down from two White House business groups, which have met only sporadically, over political controversies.

    The president hasn’t been shy about calling out businesses for perceived missteps. After his 2016 election victory Trump took aim at defense contractors Boeing and Lockheed Martin Corp. for what he called the high cost of some aircraft, and muscled United Technologies Corp. unit Carrier into keeping a plant in Indiana after the company said it would be closed and production shifted to Mexico. 

    Corporate Pushback

    Trump created two CEO advisory groups early in his presidency. Blackstone Group CEO Steve Schwarzman leads one described as a strategy and policy forum, and Dow Chemical’s Andrew Liveris organized a manufacturing initiative. After an initial burst of activity and press attention, the councils have fizzled with neither meeting since April.

    Earlier this year, Elon Musk of Tesla Inc. and Walt Disney Co. CEO Bob Iger quit the strategy and policy panel after Trump said he would withdraw from the Paris climate pact. Former Uber Technologies Inc. CEO Travis Kalanick quit in February after Trump’s executive order on immigration.

    Trump and a range of corporations have previously been at odds on other fronts.

    The administration drew criticism from a wide swath of companies over its executive order restricting immigration. More than 160 technology firms, including Amazon.com Inc., Facebook Inc., and Google corporate parent Alphabet Inc. joined a legal brief criticizing the order. Technology firms have also criticized the administration’s efforts to restrict access to H-1B visas for high-skilled workers, and eliminate an Obama Administration program that would have provided visas for foreign entrepreneurs who received startup funding.

    Other members of the Trump councils, including Lockheed Martin and PepsiCo Inc., declined to say whether they would follow the moves of the other executives in stepping down.

    Merck’s Prices

    Merck has in the past taken stands on social issues. In 2012, the company’s foundation ended funding for the Boy Scouts of America over the group’s exclusion of gays from its leadership ranks. Frazier is a registered Democrat, according to Pennsylvania voter records.

    Trump made U.S. drug prices an issue during the presidential campaign and after — at one point accusing drug companies of “getting away with murder.” While his rhetoric on the subject has cooled, the Food and Drug Administration has taken steps to try and bring more competition to the market for some drugs, and speed more generic drugs to the market.

    Frazier, in December, said his company has a “restrained” approach to price increases, calling aggressive price increases a foolhardy move by the industry. In a company report published this year, Merck said it has a “long history of making our medicines and vaccines accessible and affordable through responsible pricing practices.”

    For 2016, the list price on its drugs rose by 9.6 percent on average while the net price, which more closely reflects what is paid by consumers, rose 5.5 percent, according to the report.

    Merck shares were up 0.7 percent to $62.79 at 12:02 p.m. in New York, roughly in line with a broader advance in the U.S. stock market.

    Toby Cosgrove, the CEO of the Cleveland Clinic, plans to remain on the strategy and policy group, said Eileen Sheil, a spokeswoman for the health system. She said the group hasn’t met since April, and there are no meetings scheduled.

    Goldman Sachs Group Inc. CEO Lloyd Blankfein also took to Twitter Monday in response to the violence, citing former president Abraham Lincoln. “A house divided against itself cannot stand,” wrote Blankfein, whose inaugural tweet in June expressed disapproval over Trump’s decision to ditch the Paris climate accord.

      Read more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-08-14/merck-ceo-quits-trump-council-as-matter-of-personal-conscience

      Bees Are Bouncing Back From Colony Collapse Disorder

      The number of U.S. honeybees, a critical component to agricultural production, rose in 2017 from a year earlier, and deaths of the insects attributed to a mysterious malady that’s affected hives in North America and Europe declined, according a U.S. Department of Agriculture honeybee health survey released Tuesday. 

      The number of commercial U.S. honeybee colonies rose 3 percent to 2.89 million as of April 1, 2017 compared with a year earlier, the Agriculture Department reported. The number of hives lost to Colony Collapse Disorder, a phenomenon of disappearing bees that has raised concerns among farmers and scientists for a decade, was 84,430 in this year’s first quarter, down 27 percent from a year earlier. Year-over-year losses declined by the same percentage in April through June, the most recent data in the survey.

      Still, more than two-fifths of beekeepers said mites were harming their hives, and with pesticides and other factors still stressing bees, the overall increase is largely the result of constant replenishment of losses, the study showed.

      “You create new hives by breaking up your stronger hives, which just makes them weaker,” said Tim May, a beekeeper in Harvard, Illinois and the vice-president of the American Beekeeping Federation based in Atlanta. “We check for mites, we keep our bees well-fed, we communicate with farmers so they don’t spray pesticides when our hives are vulnerable. I don’t know what else we can do.”

      Environmental groups have expressed alarm over the 90 percent decline during the past two decades in the population of pollinators, from wild bees to Monarch butterflies. Some point to a class of pesticides called neonicotinoids as a possible cause, a link rejected by Bayer AG and other manufacturers.

      To Save Bees It Would Help to Know Why They’re Dying: QuickTake

      In the USDA study, beekeepers who owned at least five colonies, or hives, reported the most losses from the varroa mite, a parasite that lives only in beehives and survives by sucking insect blood. The scourge, present in the U.S. since 1987, was reported in 42 percent of commercial hives between April and June this year, according to the USDA. That’s down from 53 percent in the same period one year earlier. 

      Among other factors, beekeepers said 13 percent of colonies in the second quarter of this year were stressed by pesticides, 12 percent by mites and pests other than varroa and 4.3 by diseases. Bad weather, starvation, insufficient forage and other reasons were listed as problems with 6.6 percent of hives.

      Colony Collapse

      Colony Collapse, while not a main cause of loss, has perplexed scientists for more than a decade since the phenomenon of bees seemingly spontaneously fleeing their hives and not returning was first identified in the U.S. 

      As beekeepers have worked to improve hive conditions, the syndrome has waned as a concern, said May Berenbaum, head of the entomology department at the University of Illinois and a winner of the National Medal of Science.

      "It’s been more of a blip in the history of beekeeping," she said in an interview. On the other hand, "it’s staggering that half of America’s bees have mites," she said. "Colony Collapse Disorder has been vastly overshadowed by diseases, recognizable parasites and diagnosable physiological problems."

      In the survey, a hive loss was attributed to colony collapse if varroa or other mites were ruled out as a cause; few dead bees were found in a hive, a sign that they fled; a queen bee and food reserves were both seemingly normal pre-collapse; and food reserves were left alone after fleeing.

      May said his losses are highly variable depending on where his hives are located and may be affected by farmers improperly spraying pesticides. “It’s really tricky” to tease out factors behind bee deaths, he said. “Maybe it’s pesticides, maybe it’s not. But when I eliminate everything else, it’s a distinct possibility.”

      The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is reviewing neonicotinoids, proposing bans on spraying them and several dozen other pesticides in fields where bees have been brought in to pollinate a crop.
       
      A pair of scientific studies in Science last month linked neonicotinoids to poor reproduction and shorter lifespans in European and Canadian bees. The research was funded in part by Bayer CropScience and Syngenta AG, the makers of imidacloprid, clothianidin and thiamethoxam.

      “There are numerous things impacting bee health,” Syngenta Chief Executive Officer Erik Fyrwald said in an interview in Brussels last month. “One of the very minor elements there is pesticides. So it’s amazing to us that the discussion is, as a whole, about pesticides. Not only pesticides, just specifically neonics.”

        Read more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-08-01/good-news-for-bees-as-numbers-recover-while-mystery-malady-wanes

        95% Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (prostate) Non Surgical Treatment By Dr. Imtiyaz Kondkari

        This video is a talk by Dr. Imtiyaz Kondkari at HELP on 11 Feb 2013. Topic "95% Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (prostate) Non Surgical Treatment" This is part of the HELP Talk series at HELP, Health Education Library for People, the worlds largest free patient education library www.healthlibrary.com. Speaker's Info- 9http://healthlibrary.com/helptalk2113.htm

        Lilly Uses Horny Goat Weed to Fend Off Cialis Royalty Demands

        Eli Lilly & Co. told a federal jury that a German company is trying to take credit for centuries-old Chinese medicine in seeking royalties on the use of its erectile-dysfunction drug Cialis to treat an enlarged prostate.

        Erfindergemeinschaft UroPep GbR, a company founded by researchers from Hannover Medical School, claims it’s entitled to royalties from Lilly’s sale of Cialis based on a patent for prostate treatment. UroPep is seeking $84.3 million, or 12 percent of the $704 million in Cialis sales since 2011 that relate to its use in treating benign prostatic hyperplasia, also known as BPH.

        “We offered to give Eli Lilly permission” to use the patented invention, UroPep lawyer John Hughes of Bartlit Beck in Denver told a federal jury in Marshall, Texas. “Their response: silence.”

        Lilly said the patent didn’t cover anything new — and pointed to Chinese home remedies including one known as Horny Goat Weed, which it said is used both for erectile dysfunction and to treat BPH. It’s not the first time Lilly has brought up the herb — it was used to successfully invalidate part of a Pfizer Inc. patent for the rival impotence drug Viagra.

        “UroPep filed a patent with nothing more than an idea,” Lilly lawyer Todd Vare of Barnes & Thornburg in Indianapolis told the jury. The idea “is well-known and obvious throughout the world.”

        The drug, more commonly prescribed for erectile dysfunction, generated almost $2.5 billion last year, more than 11 percent of the Indianapolis-based company’s revenue. It’s Lilly’s second-biggest seller, behind the insulin Humalog, used to treat diabetes. Hughes told the jury that UroPep was not seeking royalties on any sales of Cialis for impotence.

        The UroPep patent, issued in the U.S. in 2014, is for the use of a class of compounds to treat certain prostate diseases, including BPH. Lilly contends the patent doesn’t cover the specific active ingredient in Cialis, called tadalafil.

        Cialis was approved by U.S. regulators to treat erectile dysfunction in 2008 and in December 2010 Lilly asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to also approve Cialis for treatment of the signs and symptoms of BPH.

        After Lilly got approval, one of the UroPep inventors emailed Lilly to inform it of the then-pending patent application. Lilly didn’t respond to requests for licensing talks, UroPep contends.

        This isn’t the only case in which Lilly is trying to fend off royalty demands from Cialis. The drugmaker is working to invalidate a patent owned by Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute for a method of arresting penile fibrosis.

        Presiding over the trial is Circuit Judge William Bryson, who occasionally handles district court cases but normally sits on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington, which handles all patent appeals. While neither Lilly nor UroPep are based in Texas, the case was filed there because the court is the most popular for patent litigation.

        The jury is expected to begin deliberations by Friday.

        The case is Erfindergemeinschaft UroPep GbR v. Eli Lilly & Co., 15cv1202, U.S, District Court for the Eastern District of Texas (Marshall).

        Read more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-04-17/lilly-uses-horny-goat-weed-to-fend-off-cialis-royalty-demands

        Changing the game for global health care

        (CNN)You’ve probably seen their faces on TV — eyes tired and longing for a sense of hope.

        Faces of children that say everything without speaking a single world.
          Faces of people that draw you into their reality, desperate for a helping hand.
          Many non-profit organizations that provide medical aid to the developing world have commercials that tug at the heartstrings, but one group is taking a new approach.

          The approach

          Traditionally, a lack of resources in staff and supplies at private clinics drives up the cost of care, which is often too high for a majority of the impoverished communities to afford.
          OneWorld Health says it has developed a model to change that: Health centers that are 100% sustainable, with affordable care and no need for ongoing support to keep the doors open.
          Through the reasonable cost, clinics can become fully operational and self-sustaining within 18 months of their launch, the South Carolina-based non-profit says.
          “Our sustainable health care center model has transformed the culture of health care in the areas of the world in which we operate,” said International Projects Director Michael O’Neal. “We believe that by investing in the communities where we work, a greater impact can be made and each medical center will exist long after we are gone.”
          The organization hopes that each health center will remain operationally sustainable for generations to come, allowing for hundreds of thousands of patients to receive quality health care without donor support.

          ‘Transforming communities’

          OneWorld Health currently has four operational health centers (two each in Uganda and Nicaragua), and one mobile medical unit in Nicaragua, which serves thousands of patients each month.
          Thirteen months after opening its first health care center in Uganda, patient fees began covering and then exceeding the project’s operating costs, OneWorld Health says, “meaning that the project was 100% self-sustaining with no additional donor funding required for thousands of people to receive health care.”
          Last month the non-profit opened the doors to its second clinic in Uganda, 14 months after its conceptualization — no small feat in the world of non-governmental organizations.
          At the time, the organization was operating as Palmetto Medical Initiative, but it rebranded itself OneWorld Health this week to better reflect its global vision.
          “When PMI first started, we envisioned transforming health care in communities throughout the developing world,” said co-founder and Chief Executive Matt Alexander. “In seven short years we have been astounded at just how well this idea, to bring sustainable health care to Uganda and Nicaragua, would flourish and grow into a model that empowers communities and gives individuals the ability to take ownership (of) their health.”
          Though the Charleston-based group has a new name, its mission remains the same: to help communities achieve long-term improvements in health and quality of life.
          Since the funding it receives does not have to be devoted continually to existing sites, OneWorld Health is able to use the money to invest in new health centers.

          More centers opening

          The Grammy-nominated band Needtobreathe partnered with OneWorld Health and recently raised the funds needed for them to open a new center in Tola, Nicaragua.
          “Every dollar raised allows OneWorld Health to expand and start new medical centers throughout East Africa and Central America,” said Strategic Communications Consultant Stefani Drake.
          Thanks to additional fundraising efforts from the fourth annual Needtobreathe Classic auction and golf tournament, they also raised over $200,000 for the non-profit.

          Can't even begin to express our thanks to everyone who came out to support @oneworldhealth (formally called Palmetto Medical Initiative) this weekend at the NTB Classic. Huge thanks to our compadres @switchfoot @matkearney @americanauthors @drewholcombmusic @johnmarkmcmillan @davidnail for playing at the concert last night. With your help this weekend, over $200K was raised for @oneworldhealth! Unbelievable!! THANK YOU. Can't wait for next year! ///////////////// : @joshuadrakephoto

          A photo posted by @needtobreathe on

          In addition to the new Tola health center, OneWorld Health is working to open two additional clinics later this year.
          Once the clinics are open, they will be staffed and run by national staff who receive ongoing training from U.S. board-certified medical professionals. “Each year we have plans to grow our presence in East Africa and Central America in order to transform the culture of health care and empower communities to see a true impact in their health,” Drake said.
          Which means help is coming to many more of those pleading faces.

          Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2016/03/24/world/iyw-oneworld-health-worldwide-non-profit-organization/index.html

          Lilly Uses Horny Goat Weed to Fend Off Cialis Royalty Demands

          Eli Lilly & Co. told a federal jury that a German company is trying to take credit for centuries-old Chinese medicine in seeking royalties on the use of its erectile-dysfunction drug Cialis to treat an enlarged prostate.

          Erfindergemeinschaft UroPep GbR, a company founded by researchers from Hannover Medical School, claims it’s entitled to royalties from Lilly’s sale of Cialis based on a patent for prostate treatment. UroPep is seeking $84.3 million, or 12 percent of the $704 million in Cialis sales since 2011 that relate to its use in treating benign prostatic hyperplasia, also known as BPH.

          “We offered to give Eli Lilly permission” to use the patented invention, UroPep lawyer John Hughes of Bartlit Beck in Denver told a federal jury in Marshall, Texas. “Their response: silence.”

          Lilly said the patent didn’t cover anything new — and pointed to Chinese home remedies including one known as Horny Goat Weed, which it said is used both for erectile dysfunction and to treat BPH. It’s not the first time Lilly has brought up the herb — it was used to successfully invalidate part of a Pfizer Inc. patent for the rival impotence drug Viagra.

          “UroPep filed a patent with nothing more than an idea,” Lilly lawyer Todd Vare of Barnes & Thornburg in Indianapolis told the jury. The idea “is well-known and obvious throughout the world.”

          The drug, more commonly prescribed for erectile dysfunction, generated almost $2.5 billion last year, more than 11 percent of the Indianapolis-based company’s revenue. It’s Lilly’s second-biggest seller, behind the insulin Humalog, used to treat diabetes. Hughes told the jury that UroPep was not seeking royalties on any sales of Cialis for impotence.

          The UroPep patent, issued in the U.S. in 2014, is for the use of a class of compounds to treat certain prostate diseases, including BPH. Lilly contends the patent doesn’t cover the specific active ingredient in Cialis, called tadalafil.

          Cialis was approved by U.S. regulators to treat erectile dysfunction in 2008 and in December 2010 Lilly asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to also approve Cialis for treatment of the signs and symptoms of BPH.

          After Lilly got approval, one of the UroPep inventors emailed Lilly to inform it of the then-pending patent application. Lilly didn’t respond to requests for licensing talks, UroPep contends.

          This isn’t the only case in which Lilly is trying to fend off royalty demands from Cialis. The drugmaker is working to invalidate a patent owned by Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute for a method of arresting penile fibrosis.

          Presiding over the trial is Circuit Judge William Bryson, who occasionally handles district court cases but normally sits on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington, which handles all patent appeals. While neither Lilly nor UroPep are based in Texas, the case was filed there because the court is the most popular for patent litigation.

          The jury is expected to begin deliberations by Friday.

          The case is Erfindergemeinschaft UroPep GbR v. Eli Lilly & Co., 15cv1202, U.S, District Court for the Eastern District of Texas (Marshall).

          Read more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-04-17/lilly-uses-horny-goat-weed-to-fend-off-cialis-royalty-demands

          Karl Pilkington Gets a Prostate Exam [HD]

          Ricky finally gets convinces Karl to get his prostate checked

          Subscribe for more!!!

          Best BPH Treatment Ever Invented by Dr Allen Treats Enlarged Prostate Naturally

          Good news is that BPH can now be treated naturally and effectively with Dr Allen's Device for Prostate Care, . A clinical trial confirms the efficacy of Dr Allen's Device and therapy.

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          BPH treatment breaking news: the process of prostate enlargement can be reversed. Oxford Innovation Centre and Fine Treatment ( ) share this fascinating case study: enlarged prostate has been shrunk from 130 grams to about 37 grams. David K. with benign prostatic hyperplasia used the natural prostate treatment invented by Dr. Simon Allen, MD, PhD, to achieve this successful outcome. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) video. Great news for men globally – in the USA, Canada, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia.

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