GreenLight laser surgery for an enlarged prostate

Consultant Urologist Alan Doherty of The Birmingham Prostate Clinic explains how GreenLight laser works as a treatment for men with an enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia).

Patient 58-year-old Michael Priest describes his experience of this minimally invasive procedure and subsequent recovery. Mr Priest had his operation in February 2011.

Dr.David Samadi – Open Surgery vs. DaVinci Robotic Prostate Surgery

During his custom Samadi Modified Advanced Robotic Technique (SMART), Dr. David Samadi uses the DaVinci Surgical System to expertly remove the cancerous prostate.

The 3D view, 10-15x magnification, and reduced blood loss help him spare the surrounding nerve bundles and preserve sexual potency and urinary control.
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Dr. David Samadi is the Chairman of Urology & Robotics Surgery at Lenox Hill Hospital. He's also a Fox News Medical-A-Team Contributor & Professor of Urology at Hofstra Northshore LIJ School of Medicine.

Dr. David Samadi Prostate Cancer Center is situated at 485 Madison Avenue, 21st Floor, New York, NY 10022 | Phone: +1-212-365-5000 ( )

Connect with Dr. David Samadi:

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#DrDavidSamadi @DrDavidSamadi
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Malpractice Medical TURP Transurethral Resection Prostate Surgery 3

Medical Malpractice and Patient Education Company Patient ED @ 617-379-1582 INFO
Your doctor will then…
…lift your penis upward.
A well-lubricated instrument called a resectoscope is then gently inserted into the urethra.
When the resectoscope reaches the back of the penis, your doctor will pull the penis downward in order to create a straight path into the prostate.
Using this tool, your doctor will then scrape excess tissue from the prostate, restoring it to its normal size. Medical Malpractice
Tissue removed from the prostate may be sent a laboratory for analysis.
When the surgery is complete, your doctor will remove the resectoscope. Your doctor will probably ask you to wear a temporary Foley catheter.
A Foley catheter is a narrow tube inserted through your urethra and into your bladder. The catheter is connected to a bag that is attached to your leg by a strap. While the Foley catheter is in place, urine will pass from your bladder into the bag. You will not need to urinate into a toilet. Medical Malpractice
The nurse will show you how to change the bag when it is full. An appointment will be made for you to return to the doctor's office in a couple of days to have the catheter removed. As soon as the anesthesia wears off and you feel comfortable, you'll be allowed to leave.

Medical Malpractice and Patient Education Company

Greenlight XPS 180W Prostate Laser Treatment of Male BPH (Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)

The following video highlights the benefits and techniques of the newest generation 180W Greenlight XPS laser system for the management of male BPH (benign prostatic hyperplasia). Previously, TURP, a procedure in which an electrical loop is used to cut specimens of the prostate (with risks of 4-8% transfusions, electrolyte anomalies, and prolonged hospitalization of 2-3 days) however is limited to smaller prostates less than 100g and men who are not taking any anticoagulation medications. The Greenlight laser has the advantages of little to no bleeding, no electrolyte anomalies since normal saline is used for irrigation, and is performed as an outpatient surgery. The procedure can also be offered to men with large prostates (greater than 100g), men taking blood thinner medications and those with significant comorbidities. The 3rd generation of Greenlight XPS (AMS) offers the greatest strength laser power at 180W and significantly reduces 40-50% operative times. We are proud to offer our patients the surgical management of BPH care.

TURP Transurethral Resection Prostate, Penis and Bladder – PreOp® Surgery – Patient Education

– Patient Education Company
Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a Trans Urethral Resection of the Prostate – or TURP. But what exactly does that mean?

The prostate gland is a walnut-sized organ that is part of your reproductive system.

It provides some of the fluid contained in semen.

The prostate is located just under the bladder and behind the testicles.
The urethra — a hollow tube that carries both urine and semen to the penis — passes through the prostate.

In some men, the prostate gland becomes enlarged. Symptoms of an enlarged prostate include:
Patient Education
* a full bladder feeling even when the bladder is empty

* pain when urinating

* weak urinary stream

* infertility

* and sexual dysfunction.

To relieve you of your symptoms, your doctor feels that you would benefit from a surgical procedure called TURP.

TURP is designed to relieve symptoms by reducing the size of the prostate.
It is also a diagnostic procedure. Tissue removed during a resection of the prostate or TURP is routinely screened for the presence of cancer.

So make sure that you ask your doctor to carefully explain the reasons behind this recommendation.

Your Procedure:

On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown.

You may receive a sedative by mouth and an intravenous line may be put in.

Once on the table, your feet and legs will be placed in an elevated position with your knees apart.

The nurse will swab the penis with an antiseptic solution.

Your doctor will then lift your penis upward.

A well-lubricated instrument called a resectoscope is then gently inserted into the urethra.

When the resectoscope reaches the back of the penis, your doctor will pull the penis downward in order to create a straight path into the prostate.

Using this tool, your doctor will then scrape excess tissue from the prostate, restoring it to its normal size.

Tissue removed from the prostate may be sent a laboratory for analysis.

When the surgery is complete, your doctor will remove the resectoscope. Your doctor will probably ask you to wear a temporary Foley catheter.

A Foley catheter is a narrow tube inserted through your urethra and into your bladder. The catheter is connected to a bag that is attached to your leg by a strap. While the Foley catheter is in place, urine will pass from your bladder into the bag. You will not need to urinate into a toilet.

The nurse will show you how to change the bag when it is full. An appointment will be made for you to return to the doctor's office in a couple of days to have the catheter removed. As soon as the anesthesia wears off and you feel comfortable, you'll be allowed to leave.

Patient Education Company