NIH study links cell phone radiation to cancer in male rats

New studies from the National Institutes of Health — specifically the National Toxicology Program — find that cell phone radiation is potentially linked with certain forms of cancer, but they’re far from conclusive. The results are complex and the studies have yet to be peer-reviewed, but some of the findings are clearly important enough to warrant public discussion.

An early, partial version of this study teasing these effects appeared in 2016 (in fact, I wrote about it), but these are the full (draft) reports complete with data.

Both papers note that “studies published to date have not demonstrated consistently increased incidences of tumors at any site associate with exposure to cell phone RFR [radio frequency radiation] in rats or mice.” But the researchers felt that “based on the designs of the existing studies, it is difficult to definitively conclude that these negative results clearly indicate that cell phone RFR is not carcinogenic.”

In other words, no one has taken it far enough, or simulated the radio-immersion environment in which we now live, enough to draw conclusions on the cancer front. So this study takes things up a notch, with longer and stronger exposures.

The studies exposed mice and rats to both 900 MHz and 1900 Mhz wavelength radio waves (each frequency being its own experiment) for about 9 hours per day, at various strengths ranging from 1 to 10 watts per kilogram. For comparison, the general limit the FCC imposes for exposure is 0.08 W/kg; the absolute maximum allowed, for the extremities of people with occupational exposures, is 20 W/kg for no longer than 6 minutes. So they were really blasting these mice.

“The levels and duration of exposure to RFR were much greater than what people experience with even the highest level of cell phone use, and exposed the rodents’ whole bodies. So, these findings should not be directly extrapolated to human cell phone usage,” explained NTP senior scientist John Bucher in a news release accompanying the papers. “We note, however, that the tumors we saw in these studies are similar to tumors previously reported in some studies of frequent cell phone users.”

The rodents were examined for various health effects after various durations, from 28 days to 2 years.

Before I state the conclusions, a note on terminology. “Equivocal evidence” is just above “no evidence” on the official scale, meaning “showing a marginal increase of neoplasms that may be test agent related.” In other words, something statistically significant but ultimately still somewhat mysterious. “Some evidence” is above that, meaning a more measurable response, followed by the also self-explanatory “clear evidence.”

At 900 MHz:

Some evidence linking RFR with malignant schwannoma in the hearts of male rats, no evidence for same in female rats. Equivocal evidence linking exposure to malignant brain glioma in females. Other tumors of various types in both sexes “may have been related to cell phone RFR exposure,” meaning the link is unclear or numbers aren’t conclusive. Less serious “nonneoplastic lesions” were more frequent in exposed males and females.

At 1900 MHz:

Equivocal evidence of carcinogenicity in lung, liver and other organ tissues in both male and female mice.

Although I would hesitate to draw any major conclusions from these studies, it seems demonstrated that there is some link here, though the level of radiation was orders of magnitude beyond what a person would ever experience in day to day life. As the researchers point out, however, relatively short-term studies like this one do little to illuminate the potential for harm in long-term exposure, such as babies who have never not been bathed in RF radiation.

An interesting side note is that the radiation-exposed rodents of both types lived significantly longer than their control peers: 28 percent of the original control group survived the full 2 years, while about twice that amount (48-68 percent) survived in the exposed group.

Two explanations are proffered for this strange result: either the radiation somehow suppressed the “chronic progressive nephropathy” that these mice tend to suffer from as they age, or possibly reduced feed intake related to the radiation might have done it. Either way, no one is suggesting that the radiation is somehow salutary to the rodents’ constitutions.

The reports and data run to hundreds of pages, so this is only a quick look by a non-expert. You can look over the full reports and supplemental materials here, but as this is a major study you can also expect replication, analysis and criticism from all quarters soon, including a scheduled external expert review organized by the NTP in March.

Read more: https://techcrunch.com/2018/02/02/nih-study-links-cell-phone-radiation-to-cancer-in-male-rats/

Trump Officials Dispute the Benefits of Birth Control to Justify Rules

When the Trump administration elected to stop requiring many employers to offer birth-control coverage in their health plans, it devoted nine of its new rule’s 163 pages to questioning the links between contraception and preventing unplanned pregnancies.

In the rule released Friday, officials attacked a 2011 report that recommended mandatory birth-control coverage to help women avoid unintended pregnancies. That report, requested by the Department of Health and Human Services, was done by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine — then the Institute of Medicine — an expert group that serves as the nation’s scientific adviser.

“The rates of, and reasons for, unintended pregnancy are notoriously difficult to measure,” according to the Trump administration’s interim final rule. “In particular, association and causality can be hard to disentangle.”

Multiple studies have found that access or use of contraception reduced unintended pregnancies. 

Claims in the report that link increased contraceptive use by unmarried women and teens to decreases in unintended pregnancies “rely on association rather than causation,” according to the rule. The rule references another study that found increased access to contraception decreased teen pregnancies short-term but led to an increase in the long run.

“We know that safe contraception — and contraception is incredibly safe — leads to a reduction in pregnancies,” said Michele Bratcher Goodwin, director of the Center for Biotechnology and Global Health Policy at the University of California, Irvine, School of Law. “This has been data that we’ve had for decades.”

Riskier Behavior

The rules were released as part of a broader package of protections for religious freedom that the administration announced Friday.

The government also said imposing a coverage mandate could “affect risky sexual behavior in a negative way” though it didn’t point to any particular studies to support its point. A 2014 study by the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found providing no-cost contraception did not lead to riskier sexual behavior.

The rule asserts that positive health effects associated with birth control “might also be partially offset by an association with negative health effects.” The rule connects the claim of negative health effects to a call by the National Institutes of Health in 2013 for the development of new contraceptives that stated current options can have “many undesirable side effects.” 

The rule also describes an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality review that found oral contraceptives increased users’ risk of breast cancer and vascular events, making the drugs’ use in preventing ovarian cancer uncertain.

Federal officials used all of these assertions to determine the government “need not take a position on these empirical questions.”

“Our review is sufficient to lead us to conclude that significantly more uncertainty and ambiguity exists in the record than the Departments previously acknowledged.”

    Read more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-10-06/trump-officials-dispute-birth-control-benefits-to-justify-rules

    Ejaculation after Prostate Surgery

    Many men wonder about sexual function and ejaculation after prostate cancer surgery. Dr. Bryan Wong goes over what men can expect after surgery.

    Dr. Bryan Wong, M.D., is a specialist in genitourinary malignancies involved in clinical trials and the development of novel therapies to treat patients with cancer. Board certified in internal medicine, hematology and medical oncology, Dr. Wong earned his medical degree at the Temple University School of Medicine in Philadelphia.

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    Dr.David Samadi – Open Surgery vs. DaVinci Robotic Prostate Surgery

    During his custom Samadi Modified Advanced Robotic Technique (SMART), Dr. David Samadi uses the DaVinci Surgical System to expertly remove the cancerous prostate.

    The 3D view, 10-15x magnification, and reduced blood loss help him spare the surrounding nerve bundles and preserve sexual potency and urinary control.
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    Dr. David Samadi is the Chairman of Urology & Robotics Surgery at Lenox Hill Hospital. He's also a Fox News Medical-A-Team Contributor & Professor of Urology at Hofstra Northshore LIJ School of Medicine.

    Dr. David Samadi Prostate Cancer Center is situated at 485 Madison Avenue, 21st Floor, New York, NY 10022 | Phone: +1-212-365-5000 ( )

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    Malpractice Medical TURP Transurethral Resection Prostate Surgery 3

    Medical Malpractice and Patient Education Company Patient ED @ 617-379-1582 INFO
    Your doctor will then…
    …lift your penis upward.
    A well-lubricated instrument called a resectoscope is then gently inserted into the urethra.
    When the resectoscope reaches the back of the penis, your doctor will pull the penis downward in order to create a straight path into the prostate.
    Using this tool, your doctor will then scrape excess tissue from the prostate, restoring it to its normal size. Medical Malpractice
    Tissue removed from the prostate may be sent a laboratory for analysis.
    When the surgery is complete, your doctor will remove the resectoscope. Your doctor will probably ask you to wear a temporary Foley catheter.
    A Foley catheter is a narrow tube inserted through your urethra and into your bladder. The catheter is connected to a bag that is attached to your leg by a strap. While the Foley catheter is in place, urine will pass from your bladder into the bag. You will not need to urinate into a toilet. Medical Malpractice
    The nurse will show you how to change the bag when it is full. An appointment will be made for you to return to the doctor's office in a couple of days to have the catheter removed. As soon as the anesthesia wears off and you feel comfortable, you'll be allowed to leave.

    Medical Malpractice and Patient Education Company

    Ben Stiller on Sex Life After Prostate Cancer Surgery

    Ben Stiller opened up for the first time about being diagnosed with prostate cancer at 48. He visited the Stern Show on Tuesday morning and told Howard how he and his doctor were able to detect and treat the disease. Read more:

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    TURP Transurethral Resection Prostate, Penis and Bladder – PreOp® Surgery – Patient Education

    – Patient Education Company
    Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a Trans Urethral Resection of the Prostate – or TURP. But what exactly does that mean?

    The prostate gland is a walnut-sized organ that is part of your reproductive system.

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    Once on the table, your feet and legs will be placed in an elevated position with your knees apart.

    The nurse will swab the penis with an antiseptic solution.

    Your doctor will then lift your penis upward.

    A well-lubricated instrument called a resectoscope is then gently inserted into the urethra.

    When the resectoscope reaches the back of the penis, your doctor will pull the penis downward in order to create a straight path into the prostate.

    Using this tool, your doctor will then scrape excess tissue from the prostate, restoring it to its normal size.

    Tissue removed from the prostate may be sent a laboratory for analysis.

    When the surgery is complete, your doctor will remove the resectoscope. Your doctor will probably ask you to wear a temporary Foley catheter.

    A Foley catheter is a narrow tube inserted through your urethra and into your bladder. The catheter is connected to a bag that is attached to your leg by a strap. While the Foley catheter is in place, urine will pass from your bladder into the bag. You will not need to urinate into a toilet.

    The nurse will show you how to change the bag when it is full. An appointment will be made for you to return to the doctor's office in a couple of days to have the catheter removed. As soon as the anesthesia wears off and you feel comfortable, you'll be allowed to leave.

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    Prostate Gland Surgery: Radical Prostatectomy

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    This 3D medical animation shows the laparascopic removal of a cancerous prostate gland and its surrounding tissues. A prostatectomy is a surgery to remove an enlarged prostate gland due to benign prostatic hyperplasia or prostate cancer. Simple or radical prostatectomy can be done using open or laparoscopic techniques.

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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cSjTowBBIsQ