Hillary Clinton Wins The Nevada Caucus

Hillary Clinton handily won the Nevada caucus Saturday, defeating Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) in a crucial step on the way to the Democratic presidential nomination.

Nevada was seen as a contest in which Clinton could prove that she can beat Sanders by dominating among racial minorities. That’s also the conventional wisdom on South Carolina, which holds its Democratic primary next Saturday.

“I am so, so thrilled and so grateful to all of my supporters out there,” Clinton said during her victory celebration Saturday. “Some may have doubted us, but we never doubted each other.” 

Clinton distinguished herself from Sanders by arguing that while she’s also angry about economic and racial inequality, she is the candidate with better solutions to address a broader range of problems. 

“Americans are right to be angry, but we’re also hungry for real solutions,” she said. “In the campaign, you’ve heard a lot about Washington and Wall Street. We all want to get secret unaccountable money out of politics. That starts with appointing a new justice to the Supreme Court who will protect the right of every citizen to vote, not for every corporation to buy elections. … The truth is, we aren’t a single-issue country. We need more than a plan for the big banks, the middle class needs a raise and we need more jobs.” 

The former secretary of state’s campaign was the first Democratic team to open field offices in the state last spring. In May, Clinton picked Nevada as the place to unveil her plan to reform the nation’s immigration system, which includes pushing for a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants and protecting them from deportation. Since then, she has held dozens of town hall meetings and organizing events across the state.

As polls showed a tightening race, Clinton’s campaign had begun to set expectations for a possible Sanders upset in the Silver State.

“There’s reasons to believe that Senator Sanders should fare well in a state like Nevada,” Clinton press secretary Brian Fallon told MSNBC the day of the New Hampshire primary, which Sanders won by a landslide. “Obviously there’s an important Hispanic element to the Democratic caucus-goer universe in Nevada, but it’s still a state that is 80 percent white voters. You have a caucus-style format, and he’ll have the momentum coming out of New Hampshire presumably, so there’s a lot of reasons he should do well.”

Christopher Dilts/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Victory is sweet.

As polls showed a tightening race, Clinton’s campaign had begun to set expectations for a possible Sanders upset in the Silver State.

“There’s reasons to believe that Senator Sanders should fare well in a state like Nevada,” Clinton press secretary Brian Fallon told MSNBC the day of the New Hampshire primary, which Sanders won by a landslide. “Obviously there’s an important Hispanic element to the Democratic caucus-goer universe in Nevada, but it’s still a state that is 80 percent white voters. You have a caucus-style format, and he’ll have the momentum coming out of New Hampshire presumably, so there’s a lot of reasons he should do well.”

Clinton herself rejected that Nevada-so-white take after her campaign came under criticism for the messaging. She told the state’s best-known politics reporter, Jon Ralston, that Nevada “was put into this early process because of diversity.”

According to census data from 2014, about half of Nevada’s population is non-white. Twenty-eight percent of its residents are Latino, 9 percent are African American and 8 percent are Asian American.

In the 2008 Democratic presidential caucus, Clinton won the popular vote over then-Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois, though he ultimately picked up more delegates because of how his supporters were distributed throughout the state. This time, Clinton’s campaign worked to correct that mistake, pouring resources into rural areas beyond Las Vegas, where a majority of caucus-goers reside.

While Sanders’ campaign didn’t open field offices in the state or have staff on the ground until months after Clinton’s, it quickly caught up. His campaign eventually had more paid staff on the ground than hers and spent significantly more on television ads. And in a major coup for the senator, the 60,000-strong Culinary Workers Union decided to remain neutral, robbing Clinton of the organizing muscle it had put behind Obama in 2008.

Two recent TV ads showcase the candidates’ different approaches to winning over Nevadans. Sanders put out an ad highlighting how hard the state was hit by the 2008 financial crisis, pairing Nevadans talking about losing their homes with his usual message about taking on Wall Street, fighting income inequality and breaking up the big banks. Clinton’s ad, in contrast, focused on a conversation she had with a young girl whose parents were at risk of being deported. She tells the 10-year-old that she will “do everything I can so you don’t have to be scared.”

Clinton’s Latino supporters, like longtime labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta, criticized Sanders for voting against a bipartisan immigration reform bill in 2007, with some suggesting that his current immigration advocacy had come late. Sanders, in turn, emphasized Clinton’s ties to Wall Street donors as he campaigned in Nevada, implying that she wouldn’t be as strong an advocate for reforming the financial services sector.

The race between Sanders and Clinton now turns to South Carolina’s Democratic primary on Feb. 27 and to the slew of states holding primaries and caucuses on March 1, otherwise known as “Super Tuesday.”

Polls have consistently shown Clinton ahead of Sanders by a large margin in South Carolina, where more than half of the Democratic electorate is black. Before she just barely beat Sanders in Iowa, she told Palmetto State Democrats that they were one of her “first lines of defense.” A big win for Clinton in South Carolina, combined with her Nevada victory, would help make her case that she is the more appealing candidate for a broader cross-section of Democratic voters.

Sanders could win the Colorado and Minnesota caucuses and the Massachusetts and Vermont primaries on March 1, though Clinton still looks like the favorite in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia, which all hold primaries that day.

One problem for Sanders is that Clinton has built up a huge lead among superdelegates, the Democratic officials and officeholders who do not have to support their state’s primary or caucus winner at the party’s convention this summer. The Sanders campaign’s philosophy is that in states where it can dominate among the voters, the superdelegates will feel obliged to honor the will of the grassroots. Either way, it’s months until the convention.

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2016/02/19/hillary-clinton-nevada-caucus_n_9283132.html

Our Home | Bernie Sanders

In June of 2010, 65 percent of all homeowners with a mortgage in the state of Nevada owed more than their homes were worth. While the economy is better today than it was during the recession, Nevada still has one of the highest unemployment and foreclosure rates and far too many homeowners are still underwater on their mortgages. Las Vegas has the largest share of underwater homeowners of any major market in the country.
---------
★ Join the political revolution at www.berniesanders.com

★ Connect with Bernie:
Facebook → https://www.facebook.com/berniesanders/
Twitter → https://twitter.com/berniesanders
Instagram → https://www.instagram.com/berniesanders/
Tumblr → http://berniesanders.tumblr.com/
Snapchat → bernie.sanders

★ https://connect.berniesanders.com → The campaign’s official social media organizing tool

★ About Bernie:
Bernie Sanders is a Democratic candidate for President of the United States. He is serving his second term in the U.S. Senate after winning re-election in 2012 with 71 percent of the vote. Sanders previously served as mayor of Vermont’s largest city for eight years before defeating an incumbent Republican to be the sole congressperson for the state in the U.S. House of Representatives. He lives in Burlington, Vermont with his wife Jane and has four children and seven grandchildren.

Bernard “Bernie” Sanders was born in Brooklyn, New York, to immigrant parents and grew up in a small, rent-controlled apartment. His father came to the United States from Poland at the age of 17 without much money or a formal education. While attending the University of Chicago, a 20-year-old Sanders led students in a multi-week sit-in to oppose segregation in off-campus housing owned by the university as a Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) officer. In August of 1963, Sanders took an overnight bus as an organizer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee to hear Martin Luther King Jr.’s historic “I Have a Dream” speech firsthand at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

After graduation, Bernie moved to Vermont where he worked as a carpenter and documentary filmmaker. In 1981, he was elected as mayor of Burlington as an Independent by a mere 10 votes, shocking the city’s political establishment by defeating a six-term, local machine mayor. In 1983, Bernie was re-elected by a 21 point margin with a record amount of voter turnout. Under his administration, the city made major strides in affordable housing, progressive taxation, environmental protection, child care, women’s rights, youth programs and the arts. In 1990, Sanders was elected to the House of Representatives as the first Independent in 40 years and joined the Democratic caucus. He was re-elected for eight terms, during which he voted against the deregulation of Wall Street, the Patriot Act, and the invasion of Iraq.

In 2006, Sanders defeated the richest man in Vermont to win a seat in the U.S. Senate as an Independent. Known as a “practical and successful legislator,” Sanders served as chairman of the Committee on Veterans’ Affairs where he authored and passed the most significant veteran health care reform bill in recent history. While in the Senate, Sanders has fought tirelessly for working class Americans against the influence of big money in politics. In 2010, he gave an eight-and-a-half hour filibuster-like speech on the Senate floor in opposition to extending Bush-era tax breaks for the wealthy. In 2015, the Democratic leadership tapped Bernie to serve as the caucus’ ranking member of the Senate Budget Committee.

Known for his consistency on the issues, Senator Sanders has supported the working class, women, communities of color, and the LGBT community throughout his career. He is an advocate for the environment, unions, and immigrants. He voted against Keystone XL, opposes the Trans-Pacific Partnership deal, wants to expand the Voting Rights Act, and pass the Equal Rights Amendment.


To learn more about Bernie on the issues, click here: https://berniesanders.com/issues/